Recommended: Midnight Crystal by Jayne Castle

I read Midnight Crystal by Jayne Castle recently, and I loved it. :) Although I was concerned about how well I would like the intertwining of the Arcane series with the world of Harmony, I think Midnight Crystal set my fears to rest.

Midnight Crystal bookcover

Midnight Crystal
Dreamlight Trilogy Book 3

Midnight Crystal by Jayne Castle (Paperback)
Midnight Crystal by Jayne Castle (Kindle)
Midnight Crystal by Jayne Castle (Other ebook formats)

Book Description

Book Three of the Dreamlight trilogy.

For many earthly centuries, a legendary curse has plagued the Winters family, stemming from the tumultuous founding of the Arcane Society. But now, on the futuristic world of Harmony, the curse’s final mystery will be unraveled…

Head of the ghost hunters guild Adam Winters and dreamlight reader extraordinaire Marlowe Jones must break the curse, save Harmony’s entire underworld-and fight a passion that could destroy them both.

I’ve always enjoyed the Jayne Castle books by Jayne Ann Krentz. Midnight Crystal is an interesting melding of her Harmony universe and the Arcane series and is the third book in the Dreamlight Trilogy that started with Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz and continued with Burning Lamp by Amanda Quick. Although they’re all written by the same author under different pseudonyms, the books share a connected story.

Although I’ve read all three books, I believe the books can be enjoyed just fine if you haven’t read any of the others. Ms. Krentz takes the time to slip in enough backstory so that you can figure out what’s going on without becoming lost.

Midnight Crystal was fun, exciting, romantic, and all around enjoyable reading. Try it.

Also, check out the next Jayne Castle book tied to the Arcane & Ghost Hunter/Harmony series, Canyons of Night.

Quick Review: Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz

Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz is book one of the Dreamlight Trilogy, part of the Arcane Society series. This particular series (The Dreamlight Trilogy) contains three books, one written by each of the author’s three pseudonyms: Jayne Ann Krentz, Amanda Quick, and Jayne Castle.

Fired Up bookcover

Fired Up
Dreamlight Trilogy Book 1

Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz (Paperback)
Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz (Hardcover)
Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz (Kindle)
Fired Up by Jayne Ann Krentz (Other ebook formats)

Fired Up has an interesting set of characters that trace back to the time of Sylvester Jones, the creator of the Founder’s Formula, and it focuses on the Winter’s Curse.

Book Description

Book one of the Dreamlight trilogy.

More than three centuries ago, Nicholas Winters irrevocably altered his genetic makeup in an obsessionfueled competition with alchemist and Arcane Society founder Sylvester Jones. Driven to control their psychic abilities, each man’s decision has reverberated throughout the family line, rewarding some with powers beyond their wildest dreams, and cursing others to a life filled with madness and hallucinations.

Jack Winters, descendant of Nicholas, has been experiencing nightmares and blackouts-just the beginning, he believes-of the manifestation of the Winters family curse. The legend says that he must find the Burning Lamp or risk turning into a monster. But he can’t do it alone; he needs the help of a woman with the gift to read the lamp’s dreamlight.

Jack is convinced that private investigator Chloe Harper is that woman. Her talents for finding objects and accessing dream energy are what will save him, but their sudden and powerful sexual pull threatens to overwhelm them both. Danger surrounds them, and it doesn’t take long for Chloe to pick up the trail of the missing lamp. And as they draw closer to the lamp, the raw power that dwells within it threatens to sweep them into a hurricane of psychic force.

You’ll probably need to read some of the earlier Arcane Society books, since I’m noticing a trend toward less stand-alone books. Or maybe it’s just that so much has happened now that it’s impossible to get it all out in current books without ruining the flow. The good news is that this might be true of the contemporary set novels (published under author name Jayne Ann Krentz), but less so for the historical set novels (by Amanda Quick), and not at all for the paranormal futuristics (written by Jayne Castle).

For Fired Up, though, much of the backstory is vague and I believe it wouldn’t be easy to follow unless you’ve read the previous contemporary novels in the Arcane series.

I’ve read them all, so it’s no problem for me. Since they’re all pretty good books, and some are excellent, I suggest that you just go out and read them all. These are hardcover releases, so any public library is likely to have copies of all these books, with the possible exception of the Jayne Castle books (released in paperback), which is the situation at my local library.

Quick Review: Obsidian Prey by Jayne Castle

I was so excited to pick up my copy of Obsidian Prey this past weekend. I was in the middle of another book, and for once, I actually made myself finish it before I moved on to Obsidian Prey (it was actually a very good book called Winter Kiss by Deborah Cooke).

Obsidian Prey is another of Jayne Castle’s Ghost Hunter series books. In this one, Lyra Dore and Cruz Sweetwater tangle with bad guys over some amethyst alien artifacts. There’s even a connection to the Arcane Society here.

Although some reviewers on Amazon mention that Obsidian Prey isn’t as fresh as it should be, I for one loved this story and these characters. Maybe you can blame my excitement on the fact that I only get about 1 Jayne Castle book from Krentz each year, but I don’t think so. I’m usually pretty picky. Even I didn’t care for Sizzle and Burn nearly as much as I have many of Krentz’s books. But Obsidian Prey was great.

So there you go! :) Read Obsidian Prey if you have the chance. It’s worth the time.

Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz

UPDATE: Now there’s an Odd Thomas movie.

I’ll soon be adding pages for another favorite writer of mine, one who has recently turned to writing series also. Dean Koontz has been a favorite for many years. Sometime between 1996 and 2006 I fell away from reading his books, but only because I wasn’t reading a lot during that time that wasn’t strictly romance. Over the last year, I’ve taken to reading more of his stuff.

For Christmas last year, I asked for the Odd Thomas series but I wasn’t specific about the order so I ended up with Brother Odd–but neither Odd Thomas or Forever Odd, books number 1 and 2. Can’t very well read a series out of order like that, now could I? So, I didn’t. I read other stuff, until a few days ago when I ran across a bargain priced hardback copy of Odd Thomas, and couldn’t believe my good luck!

I bought the book and read it right away.

Odd Thomas is a fry cook working at the Pico Mundo Grille. He sees dead people, but they don’t talk to him. He also sees shades, or bodachs, as he calls them. They always seem to be hanging around whenever violence is near, and Odd is afraid this time is no different. He has only a day to discover what’s going on and try to stop it.

I enjoyed Odd Thomas. The tone was different than what I was used to from Dean Koontz, although the subject matter is exactly what I’m used to.

I have to say the story touched me and at the end I was torn as to whether I should be happy or sad.

I’m going to get a copy of Forever Odd from the library (which I couldn’t do with Odd Thomas, because someone had never returned the library’s only copy). Then I’ll be able to read Brother Odd, which certainly has to be tired of waiting on me!

The books

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